Nikon D500 vs D7200

Before the D500 announcement, Nikon’s best DX camera for sports and wildlife photography has been the D7200. While the D7200 is a superb camera on its own, one might be wondering how and where exactly it differs when compared directly to the new Nikon D500. The quick answer to that question is enthusiast-level DSLR vs professional-level DSLR, but there is obviously a bit more than that to talk about. Let’s take a look at both cameras and see how they differ when it comes to ergonomics and specifications.

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Nikon 24-70mm f/2.8E VR Preview

I am currently in Death Valley NP, shooting with a bunch of new gear including the Nikon 24-70mm f/2.8E VR, so I wanted to provide my early thoughts on this lens. Some of our readers sent me concerned emails, asking what I think about the 24-70mm f/2.8E VR, since apparently some others were quite unimpressed with this lens, even putting it into the category of “one of the worst lens releases of 2015”. I am not sure where these statements come from (sadly, my Internet connection here is really bad), but based on two samples of the Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8E VR that I currently have access to, the new updated version seems to be an absolute gem. Based on my limited time pixel-peeping some of the images I have captured so far, it seems like Nikon has optimized the new 24-70mm differently when compared to its predecessor.

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11 Things You Need to Know About the New Nikon D500

The new Nikon D500 surely looks amazing and very promising – much more exciting than the new Nikon D5 in my opinion, which is surely impressive, especially for those who need such a high-end tool. While we have written about the standard specifications of the D500 and its amazing features, like its 153 point AF system and its practically unlimited buffer, there are a few other hidden features that come in the Nikon D500, which are certainly worth looking into. Let’s take a look at these in more detail.

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Nikon D500 vs Canon 7D Mark II

How does the newly released Nikon D500 flagship DX camera compare to Canon’s APS-C counterpart, the 7D Mark II? Canon was first to release its high-end sports camera over a year ago and it reigned supreme for a while, since Nikon had no equivalent product to compete with. Things have surely changed now, since the D500 is finally that long-awaited direct competitor to the 7D Mark II. This means that we can now compare these cameras directly and see which one is a better candidate for sports and wildlife photography. In this comparison, we will take a look at the specifications of the two cameras and see what their similarities and differences are. We will provide real performance differences, along with high ISO comparisons in our upcoming Nikon D500 review.

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Nikon D500 vs D300S

With the long-awaited and much-anticipated Nikon D500 out, one might be wondering how it compares to its predecessor, the Nikon D300S. Since there has been such a huge delay between the releases, it is a given that the D500 is a much better and more advanced camera. However, how much do these cameras differ really when we look at their specifications and what has changed in the last 7 years? Let’s take a look and see in this Nikon D500 vs D300S comparison.

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CX to DX: Bad User Experience

In this article, I will be responding to a detailed email from one of our readers, John D, who had a bad experience moving up from a CX to a DX camera. John started out with the Nikon 1 J1, then with hopes that he would get better results, tried out a Nikon D3300. After facing a number of issues listed below, he ended up returning the D3300. Since this type of a situation often happens to many photographers, whether they move from a cropped sensor camera to full-frame, from a mirrorless camera to a DSLR or the other way around, I thought it would be useful to share my thoughts on the matter with our readers.

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Sony A7R II Review

Earlier this year, I wrote a detailed review of the Sony A7R, where I expressed a number of serious concerns with the camera, some of which were serious enough to be categorized as “deal breakers”. Soon after, Sony announced the much-anticipated A7R II mirrorless camera, a second iteration of the high-resolution line of A7-series cameras. Although many of us knew what to expect from the A7R II based on what we have previously seen on the Sony A7 II, there was new technology incorporated into the A7R II to make it a very appealing camera among both enthusiasts and professionals. Just like the A7 II, the A7R II gained five-axis in-body image stabilization (IBIS) and a different ergonomic design with a much more comfortable to hand-hold protruded grip. And those are relatively minor changes compared to the changes from the original A7R. Not only does the A7R II get a faster and much more reliable AF system with a whopping 399 focus points, but it also gains a brand new 42 MP back-illuminated (BSI) sensor. In addition, Sony addressed the serious shutter-shock issue by not only reducing the overall noise and vibration caused by the shutter mechanism, but also by introducing an electronic front-curtain shutter release option, which completely gets rid of shutter-related blur in images. And lastly, with the latest firmware upgrade, the Sony A7R II also gained the ability to shoot uncompressed RAW, giving the ability to take a full advantage of the sensor. I have been shooting with the Sony A7R II since it was announced, so let’s take a closer look at the Sony A7R II and see how it performed both in real world and lab environments.

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Canon G5 X User Experience

There must be something very rotten in the state of Denmark when Alpha Whiskey starts talking about gear. Have I completely lost my mind?! Did I give in to the Dark Side of The Force? What’s the matter with me? Joking aside, this isn’t as comprehensive a look at a camera as one of Nasim’s reviews. I’ve always had a tremendous appreciation for the Herculean effort he puts into his reviews; now that I’ve written this brief article about a camera myself that appreciation is infinite. And while our gear is secondary to our creativity, of course the latter benefits from the former; it’s just not something I usually spend my time worrying about.

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Sample Images with 1 Nikon 10-100mm f/4-5.6

Over the past couple of weeks I’ve had the opportunity to do some testing with the 1 Nikon 10-100mm f/4-5.6 lens. This is one of the few 1 Nikon lenses that I’ve never used before and I was intrigued to find out how it would perform. I thought readers may enjoy seeing a few sample images taken with this lens, mounted on a Nikon 1 V2. The 1 Nikon 10-100 is a fairly small, compact lens as you can see in the photo below.

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Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Contemporary Review

Although Tamron pioneered the release of the first 150-600mm lens, Sigma followed suit by releasing two versions of lenses with exactly the same focal length and aperture ranges. The smaller and lighter version, the Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Contemporary (the one we are reviewing today), targets the same market as the Tamron 150-600mm f/5-6.3 Di VC USD, while the much larger and heavier “Sport” version is something unique to Sigma, with no other equivalent competing offers from any other manufacturer. Being able to reach 600mm without spending a lot of money has been a big dream of many wildlife photographers on a budget, because anything close to the 600mm range typically translates to a very large expense – as much as $12K for the latest generation 600mm f/4 lenses. While the current 150-600mm lenses cannot offer the maximum aperture of f/4, they give a huge focal range to work with, which can be particularly useful when photographing subjects at varying distances. As many 600mm prime lens owners know, shooting with long glass is not an easy task due to both weight and atmospheric haze concerns. Such lenses can be quite limiting when the action is close, such as when photographing bears in Alaska, or taking pictures on an African safari. For such occasions, many pros love the 200-400mm f/4 lenses, because they give that flexibility to shoot action at both close and long distances. However, the high cost and the weight concerns are still there, making such lenses prohibitive for budget-conscious enthusiasts and pros who prefer shooting hand-held. And that’s when the 150-600mm lenses come to the rescue, offering great performance in a lightweight and relatively low-budget package. At just over $1K and a total weight of 1930 grams (4.25 pounds), the Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Contemporary is a very attractive lens for sports and wildlife photographers. In this review, we will be taking a closer look at this lens and compare it to the Tamron 150-600mm lens that we previously reviewed and loved.

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