Nikon D7200 vs D7100

Nikon D7200 vs D7100

Some of our readers might be interested in seeing how the newly announced Nikon D7200 compares to its predecessor, the D7100 in terms of features and specifications. With a faster processor, improved AF system, much larger buffer, Wi-Fi and a few other tweaks, the D7200 is currently Nikon’s best DX camera for capturing fast action such as sports and wildlife photography. Although the D7100 is still an amazing camera, many found its buffer to be underwhelming for continuous shooting, as it sported a fairly small buffer that accommodated even less images than the first generation Nikon D7000. In this comparison, I will first go into specifications, then talk about specific features that differentiate the two cameras. Please keep in mind that this comparison is purely based on specifications. Further details, our impressions, ISO comparisons and other useful information will be provided in our upcoming Nikon D7200 Review later this year.

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Nikon D7200 High Resolution Sample Images

Nikon D7200 Sample Images (4)

The Nikon D7200 has been announced, but full resolution image samples are not yet available at NikonUSA or Nikon Imaging. Below are the images I was able to find through Nikon Japan. At this time there are only 5 full-resolution image samples available, but I will update this article if I find more this week. Sadly, all images below were captured at ISO 100 and there are no high ISO samples to look at yet. Nikon Asia and other regional sites do have more sample images, but none of them are at full size.

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Nikon D7200 Announcement

Nikon D7200

It has been two years since Nikon announced the D7100 and today the company announced its replacement, the Nikon D7200. A number of things have changed / improved from the D7100, most notably: improved 51-point AF system with -3 EV sensitivity, built-in Wi-Fi with NFC, faster EXPEED 4 processor, larger buffer capacity, improved battery life and a slightly modified 24.2 MP APS-C sensor with a larger native ISO range of 100 – 25,600. Looks like Nikon finally addressed the buffer concern with this release, giving a three times larger buffer that can fit 18 14-bit RAW files compared to the D7100. The sensor on the D7200 is probably a tweaked version of the excellent sensor from the D5300 (made by Sony), which should provide pretty clean images at high ISOs. The camera retains the price of its predecessor at $1,199 MSRP. Looks like it is a great update to the already excellent D7100, which we have previously reviewed and praised for its superb performance. Judging by its build / ergonomics and the same continuous shooting speed of 6 fps, the D7200 won’t directly compete with the Canon 7D Mark II, which still leaves room for the potential release of the D400 later this year.

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Big Canon Price Drops on 5D Mark III and 6D

Canon 5D Mark III

We have just received information from our partners B&H Photo Video and Adorama that Canon is significantly dropping prices on both 5D Mark III and 6D cameras. It is hard to say whether these price drops are coming as a result of the Japanese Yen depreciation, or perhaps Canon is planning to release replacements to these cameras soon and wants to clean off the shelves before new products hit the market. Either way, these are great prices on great cameras. We have previously reviewed both Canon 5D Mark III and Canon 6D and found them to be quite solid. So if you are invested in Canon glass and accessories and need to replace that aging 5D or 5D Mark II, or want to move up to full-frame from an APS-C camera, this might be a good opportunity to do so. At $2,499 for the Canon 5D Mark III ($300 price drop and $300 instant rebate) and $1,399 for the Canon 6D, these are the lowest prices on the two cameras we have seen to date.

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Sony A7 II Review

Sony A7 II

October 16 of 2013 marks an important milestone in the history of photography, because it is the date when Sony announced world’s first full-frame mirrorless cameras, the Sony A7 and A7R. The Sony A7, being the cheaper model aimed for general use, sports a 24 MP sensor and offers hybrid autofocus, while the A7R with its high resolution 36 MP sensor is targeted at more specific types of photography including landscape, architecture, studio and product photography. Since the official release of these cameras, I had a chance to test both in 2014 as soon as they were available. However, I did not write detailed reviews for a number of reasons including native lens shortage and availability, all kinds of initial firmware bugs and lags, shutter vibrations (A7R), slow start up time, compressed RAW, terrible menu system, poor battery life and a number of other annoying issues. On top of that, 2014 was also a year of personal transformation for me, so I was incredibly busy trying to shuffle a lot of things at the same time. To put it short, my lack of time and my negative experience with these cameras contributed to reviews being put off for a later date. When Sony released the A7S a bit later, I did not see drastic changes aside from the camera sensor, so I put off reviewing that camera for a while as well. However, when Sony announced the second iteration of the A7-series, the A7 II, I immediately requested a review unit for evaluation. By then, Sony already had a few more native lenses to choose from and I had high hopes that Sony perhaps addressed many of the concerns from the original A7 in this new camera. In addition, the Sony A7 II came with in-body image stabilization (IBIS), which interested me a lot – with so many different adapters available for other lens mounts, the A7 II looked rather promising as a versatile tool that could stabilize pretty much any lens on the market. And that in itself sounded really good, so off I went with my journey to assess the new Sony A7 II.

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How Much Resolution Do You Really Need?

Lightroom Library Filter ISO

Each year camera manufacturers are pushing the limits of sensor technology and the latest trend has been to increase sensor resolution to numbers that were considered unfathomable before. With full-frame cameras reaching 50 megapixels (MP) and medium format cameras pushing beyond 80 MP, we now know that the megapixel race won’t stop there and we will most likely be seeing cameras with even more resolution in the future. But the big question remains – how much resolution does one truly need today? Is 12 MP too little? Is 50 MP too much? While it is a subject that can be open to endless debates, I have been working on a methodology to determine the ideal megapixel range for one’s needs. In this article, I will share what I came up with and it will hopefully serve as a good guide for our readers in deciding how to address the megapixel quench. I highly recommend to read my camera resolution explained article as a pre-requisite to understand the relationship of resolution to printing, cropping, display size and to understand such terms as down-sampling in more detail.

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Incredible Time-lapse of the Sun from NASA

Magnificent Eruption Still

One of our readers was kind enough to send a link to a YouTube video from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Obervatory (SDO), which has been capturing images of the whole sun 24 hours a day for the last 5 years. After putting together image sequences into a time-lapse, NASA created a stunning video that is absolutely worth watching. If you visit NASA’s official website, you can click on the Related Media link and see many more videos and images from SDO, which are all as amazing as the below video:

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Camera Resolution Explained

Image Resolution Comparison

Although the megapixel race has been going on since digital cameras had been invented, the last few years in particular have seen a huge increase in resolution – we have seen everything from 41 megapixel camera phones to now 50.6 megapixel full-frame DSLR cameras. It seems like we have already reached the theoretical maximum for handling noise at high ISOs with the current generation sensor technology, so the manufacturers are now focusing their efforts in packing more resolution, while keeping sensor sizes the same in order to lure more customers to upgrade to the latest and greatest. In this article, I will try to explain some basic terminology in regards to resolution and hopefully help our readers in understanding camera resolution better.

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Nikon Lens-Only and Camera Rebates are Now Live!

Nikon Lens Only Rebates

For the next 13 days, Nikon will again offer lens-only rebates as it has previously done in the past. This is pretty exciting news for many Nikon shooters that already own Nikon cameras and are only interested in buying lenses – many of our readers have been waiting for such a rebate for a while now. In addition to these lens rebates, Nikon is also simultaneously running its “Buy Together and Save” rebate program, where additional savings are provided if you buy one of the Nikon DSLRs. Let’s take a look at these savings in more detail.

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Sigma 24mm f/1.4 Art and Sigma 150-600mm Available for Pre-Order

Sigma 24mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art

Just a day after Sigma announced its 24mm f/1.4 Art lens, it has now also announced both pricing and availability of the Sigma 24mm f/1.4 Art lens. I honestly expected over $1K price for this quality of the lens, so I was a bit shocked to see that the lens will be sold at $849, which is tremendous value if you compare it to Nikon and Canon 24mm f/1.4 counterparts. Another much anticipated lens, the Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 DG OS HSM Contemporary is also available for pre-order for $1,089, which is priced right around the same as the Tamron 150-600mm which we highly praised in our in-depth review. Both lenses are expected to ship around March 20, 2015.

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