Nikkor 400mm f/2.8E VR

Read this in-depth review of the Nikon 400mm f/2.8E FL ED VR lens with detailed information, specifications, image samples and comparisons to other Nikkor super telephoto lenses

Nikon P900

An in-depth review of the Nikon Coolpix P900 point and shoot camera with sample images, high ISO tests and detailed real-life analysis

Really Right Stuff BH-55 Pro Ballhead

Review of the Really Right Stuff BH-55 full size ballhead by Nasim Mansurov with sample images and comparisons to other tripod heads.

Street Photography (13)

If you become a student of street photography, the curriculum is littered with advice and maxims on what defines and makes a “good” street photograph; […]

Process of Visualization (24)

Hello, my name is Rick Keller. I am an amateur photographer who lives in San Diego, CA, one of many readers of Photography Life, and […]

Crab at Sunrise

Macro photography is one of the most popular forms of photography, and with good reason. It is easily accessible, and it is a very broad […]

Dumbing Down the D7200 – What Nikon Doesn’t Get About Wildlife Photography

Verm-Lesser-Nighthawk-Dripping-Springs-9033

With the introduction of the D7200, Nikon gave another slap in the face to wildlife photographers. Instead of shrinking the buffer, like they did with the D7100, this time they slashed the frame rate by 17% at top image quality (compared to the even older D7000, I’ll explain later). Folks hoping Nikon would answer Canon’s release of the 7D Mark II are certainly disappointed. There are two things Nikon doesn’t seem to get about wildlife photography. First, wildlife photographers don’t want to pick either a DX or FX body to shoot with, we want one of each that will work together as a system – an FX body for great low-light capability and a DX option when we need extra reach. Both circumstances come up on an almost daily basis for the wildlife photographer. The second thing Nikon doesn’t get is that wildlife photography is no longer a pursuit reserved only for rich hobbyists.

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Fujinon XF 16mm f/1.4 R WR Announcement

Fujinon XF 16mm f/1.4 R WR

Today is a big day for Fuji, because the company has just announced its first wide angle weather resistant prime lens, the Fujinon XF 16mm f/1.4 R WR. This is a pretty significant milestone for Fuji, because the lens is equivalent to a 24mm lens in terms of field of view on full-frame, which is a very popular focal length for many different types of photography such as landscapes, architecture and environmental portraiture. Being a fast f/1.4 lens, it is also a great candidate for low-light photography. On top of that, Fuji made this lens weather resistant to withstand both dust and moisture, so it will couple greatly with the Fuji X-T1 and future weather-sealed cameras.

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Nikon D750 – Additional $300 Instant Rebate

Nikon D750

Big news for our US readers – Nikon has just cut the price of the D750 by an additional $300 instant rebate, bringing the price down to $1,999! And if you need a camera with the 24-120mm f/4G VR lens, you can get the combo for $2,700. If you want to get some additional savings on other lenses, Nikon’s Buy Together and Save program is still on. That’s a pretty sweet deal for what I consider to be the best all around Nikon full-frame DSLR. You can read my detailed Nikon D750 review to learn more about the capabilities of the camera.

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Zeiss Loxia 35mm and 50mm – Superb Performers

Zeiss Loxia 35mm f/2

One of the biggest complaints the Sony full-frame mirrorless system has been receiving, is lack of good lens choices. With the launch of the Sony FE mount, Sony introduced only two high quality prime lenses in collaboration with Zeiss, the FE 35mm f/2.8 ZA and the FE 55mm f/1.8 ZA, both of which have been designed specifically for the short flange distance of the Sony A7 series cameras and have stellar optical characteristics. In September of 2014, Zeiss introduced two additional high quality primes for the Sony FE mount. Dubbed “Loxia”, these lenses are quite different from the Sony versions in a number of ways. First, they are both engineered and made by Zeiss, which means higher quality build and construction. Second, similar to many other Zeiss lenses, the Loxia line is manual focus only – and it is designed to be so. Third, they are also optimized for videographers, with a “DeClick” feature, which allows for smooth adjustment of aperture right on the lens. A number of our readers expressed interest in the Loxia lenses, so after having an opportunity to shoot with these gems, I was able to measure their optical performance in my lab. In this article, I would like to provide some information on the optical characteristics of the two Loxia lenses. Let’s start with the Loxia 35mm f/2:

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Does Fuji Cheat with its Sensors?

Fuji X-T1 ISO 3200 +0.85 EV

When testing cameras, it is not unusual to see a situation when one camera can produce results a bit darker or brighter than another. In some cases, lenses are to blame for this variance, since most lenses cannot ideally transmit all of the incoming light. What this means, is that a lens with a maximum aperture of f/2.8 could potentially transmit less light, which could be equivalent to say f/3.5 in terms of brightness. The latter number is what is often referred to as a “T-stop”, or Transmission-stop, which is basically an adjusted f-stop that takes into account this light loss. In other cases, the camera itself can be the source of brightness variance. Although manufacturers are supposed to adhere to an ISO standard that guides the process of determining the right brightness level for each ISO, there is usually still some variance between not only brands, but also between specific camera models. We won’t get into the question of why there are such variances. Instead, we will concentrate on implications of such variances to camera sensor comparisons and ratings. Particularly, we will be looking at exposure variances in Fuji cameras, such as the Fuji X-T1. Many photographers, including myself, have been fond of the way Fuji sensors render images, outputting very clean and pleasant-looking images, even at high ISOs. But are those ISOs real? And is Fuji doing something shady to make its images look better? Let’s take a closer look…

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Weekly Critique Section #2

DharmeshJani_AsTheDayEnds

This article is the second part of a weekly critique section at Photography Life, where one or more of us will provide feedback and tips for reader-submitted photos. All of the images we feature come from the photo critique forum, and each one stands out to us in its own right. This week, I will be sharing my thoughts on two recent submissions to the photo critique forum: “As the Day Ends” by Jani Dharmesh, and “European Green Woodpecker” by Dusan Vainer.

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Visualization: The Hunt for the Light

Visualization (4)

In my recent essay on visualization, I discussed the historical and modern day significance of this concept in photography as well as the role that a composition card serves in bridging the vision in the mind to its tangible realization into an image. In this follow-up essay, I will discuss the interplay of other critical aspects of visualization that accompany, if not transcend, the tangible aspects.

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High Magnification Macro Photography on a Budget

Macro Photography (5)

Hey folks, my name is Siddhant Sahu, I am a 16 years old aspiring photographer from India. I have been shooting macro photographs for about a year now and I would try to encapsulate all I have learnt along my way in this short article. I believe that macro photography has the power of entering in a whole new world of tiny creatures. In fact with only modest piece of equipment you can shoot high magnification macro photographs. It’s good to mark the behavior of insects and how close you can approach some of them, but then again these are wild animals and there is no way to predict how exactly they will behave, each subject can be different, each background can be different. But with digital photography there is no penalty to shoot thousands and thousands of photos, and eventually someday among those thousands photos one particular would be usable enough. Anyone is capable of doing this, you don’t need the greatest lens or the newest camera out there. Macro photography is physically exhausting, challenging and requires a lot of patience and time consuming but you can get amazing results with fair piece of equipment.

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