Photographing American High School Football

American High School Football (5)

Almost every American High School has a football team, and it is perhaps the major sport for all such schools. Homecoming is almost invariably scheduled for a week when the team has a home game. As such, this sport, perhaps more than any other, serves as a great opportunity for taking pictures. I normally shoot Football with two cameras: one with a zoom lens for the action shots, and one with a shorter fixed lens for the sideline shots. For cameras I used to use a D3S (action shots) and a D800E (candid shots), however I have replaced the D3S with a D810.

[Read more...]

Photographing High School Volleyball

Volleyball (1)

After the heat of summer, when students return to school in the United States, Volleyball is one of the sports played in the Fall season. It moves from being an outside sport, to an inside one. This is unfortunate, at least from a photographic point of view, since most High School gyms are poorly lit. However, even in these conditions, with some practice and the right equipment, you can still get good pictures.

[Read more...]

High School Sports Photography Tips

High School Sport Photography (11)

In response to requests from comments on my earlier “Sideline Photography Tips“, this article will address shooting High School sports. I have specialized in sports photography for years, shooting almost every High School sport played in Florida. Please note, I am semi-retired, and though I do sell some photos, I don’t make a living at this. These tips are for people looking to shot sports for themselves, their family and friends (and maybe the occasional sale).

[Read more...]

Sideline Photography Tips

Sideline Photography Tips (1)

As a dedicated sports photographer I have shot many different sports, mostly concentrating on the action. However, some sports require more attention than others, and all of them have “dead” or non-action time. During such time you can either review the shots you recently took, or look for “opportunity” shots; a chance to catch people unawares, to photograph them as they really are, instead of how they look when they pose for a picture. I have always preferred candid shots over posed shots, and feel that such shots are “truer” visions of the subject.

[Read more...]

Why I Love the Nikon E Series (AKA Really Cheap) Lenses

Nikon E Series Lenses (8)

At a time when the digital photography world was buzzing with new gear announcements, I managed to fall in love with some of Nikon’s very old and cheap lenses, the E Series lenses. My experience with these lenses taught me a great lesson: it is really not about the gear. It is rather about being creative with what gear we already have, despite how limited and incapable we might think of it. This was a great inspiration to me, especially with my nagging habit of lusting after the latest and greatest gear announcements. The fact that I’m writing this article goes to show that I still struggle with GAS (gear acquisition syndrome), but for a change, this is a case about some of the cheapest lenses available.

[Read more...]

Capturing Action with a Micro Four Thirds Camera

Skater in Motion #1

For many people, the main limitation of the micro 4/3 systems, while being more portable and fun, has been in capturing movement and action, owing to the contrast-detection AF system. And they would be entirely correct. While it is super fast for static subjects, the lack of effective phase detection AF, as found on DSLRs and other mirrorless systems, causes difficulty in tracking moving subjects.

[Read more...]

How to Photograph Interior Domes of Popular Landmarks

Praha Kreuzherrenkirche Thumb

Incredibly, the first domes date back to people living in the Mediterranean region 4,000 years BC. Since then, artists have created a fascinating variety of them all over the world. Still today, they are an essential part of modern architecture, as shown for example by Calatrava’s spectacular glass dome of the library of the Institute of Law in Zurich, Switzerland.

[Read more...]

Wildlife Photography as a Career

Gentoo Penguin

If I was to be completely honest about encouraging people about setting out on a career in wildlife photography, I feel these days I could sum it up in two words. ‘Forget it!’ Having said that, I do not take rejection of article ideas well, I am poor at self-promotion and I am not brilliant at keeping my agents supplied with my latest images. Finally, I do not keep up to date with all of the latest camera bodies which produce superior image quality compared to the old Canon EOS 1D Mk2 I am still using for my wildlife pictures and the Canon EOS 5D Mk2 that I use for landscapes.

[Read more...]

Micro Four Thirds vs DSLR Camera Considerations

Olympus 60mm F/2.8, ISO 200. Richmond Park, London.

Warm greetings to my fellow Photography Life readers! My name is Sharif and I am the photographer behind Alpha Whiskey Photography. I have been very kindly asked by Nasim to write an article for Photography Life, which has proved to be an excellent resource for photographers all over our planet. Nasim specifically invited me to write about my experience with my Olympus Micro Four Thirds mirrorless camera, the lenses I choose to use with it, and why I prefer it to my DSLR system, along with some examples of images I have produced with it.

[Read more...]

Weye Feye Review

Weye Feye Default Screen Zoomed

This is a review of Weye Feye product (usage with Nikon D800 camera, iPhone 5 & iPad 2). Weye Feye is a wireless and remote control unit for a DSLR. This product is made by a company called “XSories”. I think this is a French company with a subsidiary located in Hong-Kong. Another device providing similar functionality (and known better than Weye Feye) is CamRanger. The primary reason why I started looking at an external camera control unit was pretty simple. Prior to purchasing and using the D800, I was using Olympus E-5 cameras (still use them). Olympus E-5 has a fully articulating LCD screen. Having this fully articulating screen was and is very convenient, as I often take shots with strange angles, especially low to the ground. Most of the semi-pro DSLRs (just about all brands) do NOT have articulating screens. The absence of this functionality on semi-pro and pro cameras actually infuriates me, because it significantly limits the artistic ability of the photographer. Why do I have to get down either on all fours or my stomach or in a crouching tiger position in order to get the shot I need? Please, put articulating screens on these cameras! So when I got my D800, I was searching for a long time for a device that could “replicate” the articulating screen of my E-5s. There are many various add-ons available, but all add significant bulk to the camera, require separate batteries and seem very cumbersome. Most of my photography is done in an external, non-studio environments, so I try to limit the bulk of my equipment.

[Read more...]