Canon 6D Full-Frame DSLR Announcement

Canon EOS 6D

Canon has just announced its latest DSLR and a direct competitor to the already highly popular D600. The Canon EOS 6D offers a new 20.2 megapixel full-frame sensor, 11-point autofocus system with one cross-type sensor, 3.2″ 1.04 million dot screen and 4.5 frames per second. According to Canon, 6D is similarly sized as it’s sister, APS-C sensor EOS 60D, and it sure look similar – add a taller prism and take pop-up flash compartment. Use of old autofocus system might not sound too good, but Canon promises it’s their most sensitive AF system to date (which should probably include 1DX and 5DIII), offering reliable AF in -3EV (moonlight). The 6D also boasts in-build GPS and WiFi capability.

Canon EOS 6D top

Nasim will prepare a thorough review as soon as he has enough experience with the camera, so stay tuned!

Specifications

  1. Sensor: 20.2 MP CMOS
  2. Sensor Size: 36 x 24mm
  3. Resolution: 5472 x 3648
  4. Native ISO Sensitivity: 100-25,600
  5. Boost Low ISO Sensitivity: 50
  6. Boost High ISO Sensitivity: 51200, 102400
  7. Processor: Digic 5+
  8. White Balance presets: 6
  9. Dust Reduction: Yes
  10. Weather Sealing/Protection: Yes
  11. Body Build: Magnesium Alloy with Plastic top plate
  12. Shutter: 30s-1/4000s
  13. Storage: 1 SD/SDHC/SDXC slot
  14. Viewfinder Coverage/Magnification: 97%/0.71x
  15. Speed: 4.5 fps
  16. Metering Modes: Multi, Center-weighted, Spot, Partial
  17. Metering Sensor: 63-Zone Dual Layer
  18. Built-in Flash: NO
  19. Flash sync speed: 1/180s
  20. Autofocus options: Contrast Detect (sensor), Phase Detect, Multi-area, Selective single-point, Single, Continuous, Face Detection, via Live View
  21. Autofocus System: 11-point with one cross-type (center point), sensitive down to -3EV
  22. LCD Screen: 3.2 inch diagonal with 1,040,000 dots
  23. Video capabilities: h.264 with mono mic and speakers, manual controls, 1920 x 1080 (29.97, 25, 23.976 fps), 1280 x 720 (59.94, 50 fps), 640 x 480 (25, 30 fps)
  24. In-Camera HDR Capability: Yes
  25. GPS/WiFi: built-in/built-in
  26. Connectivity: USB 2.0 (480 Mbit/sec), HDMI Mini, WiFi (built-in), remote control with N3 type contact, Wireless Controller LC-5, Remote Controller RC-6
  27. Battery Type: Lithium-Ion LP-E6 rechargeable battery & charger
  28. Weight: 770 g (1.70 lb / 27.16 oz) with battery
  29. Price: $2099 body only

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Canon EOS 7D Firmware Update v2.0

As we have seen recently, most new cameras seem to have flaws when they are first launched into production. Aside from rare hardware flaws that often require recalls and part replacements, many newly introduced cameras often suffer from software issues that can be later fixed via camera-specific software updates, known as “firmware”. We’ve had such updates for almost any DSLR, and also some flash units (like Nikon SB-900) and lenses, too. One of the most significant firmware updates, for instance, was released by Fujifilm for their highly regarded, yet also rather buggy (at launch) X100 camera, which has been significantly improved thanks to those updates. Ever since, Fujifilm has gained a lot of respect from its customers for showing how much they care about improving their products even after release – many hope and believe the Fuji X-Pro1 updates will follow with plenty of improvements as well.

While it is somewhat expected that camera bugs are addressed via firmware updates, most manufacturers do not bother with additional updates once the biggest issues are taken care of. As digital cameras are getting more complex with different picture/movie modes and many new in-camera editing functions, those innovations are typically pushed to newer camera models. Even if older cameras have enough processing power and memory, manufacturers want consumers to buy a newer product instead.

Canon 7D

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Canon EOS M Compact System Camera Announced

On July 23, London, UK, Canon has finally announced its mirrorless system to compete with Nikon 1, Sony NEX, Samsung NX and other brand offerings. Having neglected this market share for about 4 years now since the introduction of the first Micro Four Thirds camera, the Panasonic Lumix DMC-G1 (which may not have been the first camera to lack a moving mirror and an optical viewfinder, but offer interchangeable lens mount, but it sure was the first to really spark an interest in such a design), Canon seems to have finally admitted the potential behind affordable, small, interchangeable lens, high image quality cameras, and stepped up to the challenge. Lets see what the last DSLR manufacturer to enter this segment has to offer.

Canon EOS M front view

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Colorado Wildfires

It has been unusually stormy this summer so far in Denver. After all the mega hail storms, nasty winds and lots of rain, we are now experiencing very hot temperatures above 90 degrees Fahrenheit. And with the lack of snow in snow peaks this year, storms and high winds sparked up wildfires in various places, destroying forests and people’s homes. So far, it has been one of the worst seasons for Colorado – wildfire near Fort Collins alone has already consumed close to 60 thousand acres of woodland. Overall, it is a pretty sad situation for us Coloradans…

Sunset Lamps

This terrible weather and sudden changes in temperatures are creating unusually beautiful skies… I captured the above image a couple of weeks ago, right after we experienced golf-size hail in some areas of Colorado.

Captured with the Canon 24mm f/1.4L on the Canon 5D Mark III. Lightroom 4 adjustments: Clarity +50, Saturation +15, Camera Standard profile.

Novoflex Nikon to Canon Lens Adapter Review

This is a review of the Novoflex Nikon to Canon Lens Adapter, also known as “Novoflex EOS/NIK-NT Lens Adapter”. This lens adapter is designed to be used specifically with Nikon G lenses that have no aperture rings. While most generic lens adapters can be easily used with older non-G Nikon lenses and you can easily control aperture by just rotating the aperture ring on the lens, there is no way to control aperture on all modern “G” type lenses with such an adapter. So if you used a generic lens adapter, you would be limited to shooting at minimum aperture of the lens (default) and there would be no physical way to adjust it while the lens is attached to the camera. To allow manual change of aperture on these types of lenses, Novoflex specifically designed an adapter with an aperture lever. In this review, I will talk about the pros and cons of using the Novoflex adapter and my overall experience with it when mounting Nikon lenses on Canon DSLRs.

Novoflex Nikon to Canon Lens Adapter

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Use Nikon Lenses on Canon DSLRs

While testing some Canon EF lenses on the Canon 5D Mark III, I decided to try to compare the lenses to the latest Nikon lenses and see how they perform side by side. First, my plan was to mount Nikon lenses on the D800 and Canon lenses on the 5D Mark III and look at images at 100% view, but then I realized that it would be tough to do a fair comparison, since the cameras are different. That’s when I thought about using Nikon lenses on a Canon DSLR with an adapter. I knew that it was possible, since some people love mounting the Nikon 14-24mm f/2.8G on Canon cameras. In this article, I will share my thoughts and experience on using Nikon lenses on Canon DSLRs.

Nikon 50mm f/1.4 with Novoflex Canon Adapter

1) Can Nikon lenses be mounted on Canon DSLRs?

As I have said above, yes, you can mount all Nikon F mount lenses (even the latest “G” type lenses without an aperture ring) on any Canon DSLRs – you will need a Nikon to Canon lens adapter to do that. There are plenty of options available from different brands. Generic adapters can be bought for less than $20, but those will only work with older Nikkor lenses with aperture rings. For “G” type lenses, you will need specialized adapters that could cost up to $300 USD.

2) Can Canon lenses be mounted on Nikon DSLRs?

No, Canon lenses cannot be mounted on Nikon DSLRs. Technically it is possible to design an adapter to do it, but you will not be able to focus to infinity. This is due to the fact that Nikon DSLRs have a longer distance between the lens flange and the sensor (focal plane), which would make Canon lenses behave almost like extension tubes. Nikon has a flange focal distance of 46.5mm, while Canon’s EF mount is 44mm as can be seen in this chart. So while a 2.5mm thick adapter could be used on Canon DSLRs, it would be impossible to go in reverse direction on Nikon DSLRs.

3) Why Do It?

So, why mount a Nikon lens on a Canon DSLR? Normally, you would not want to. Nikon lenses are designed to be used with Nikon DSLRs and Canon lenses are also specifically designed to be used with Canon DSLRs. At times, however, there might be a need to do it. Here are some reasons I could think of:

  1. You shoot with both Nikon and Canon DSLRs and you have some good Nikon lenses that you want to be able to use on your Canon DSLR. You do not feel like buying a similar lens from Canon, so buying an adapter would be a cheaper alternative.
  2. You shoot videos on a Canon DSLR and you want to be able to change lens aperture silently using an adapter, rather than rotating the lens aperture ring or the dial on the camera.
  3. You really love the Nikon 14-24mm f/2.8G and want to use it on your 5D Mark III.
  4. You converted from Nikon to Canon and you still have some classic Nikkor lenses that you do not want to part with. Using them with an adapter on a Canon DSLR sounds like a good option.
  5. You just want to do it for fun!

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Fuji X-Pro1 Camera Comparisons

I have just updated the Fuji X-Pro1 Review with detailed camera comparisons with the Canon 5D Mark III and Nikon D800. RAW support has finally become available with the latest updates from Adobe for both Lightroom and Photoshop, so I was able to extract RAW files from all cameras to do a comprehensive analysis. My findings? The Fuji X-Pro1 RAW images look as impressive as the JPEG images. Despite the fact that I down-sampled the Nikon D800 and Canon 5D Mark III images, which should give them an advantage in terms of handling noise, the pixel level quality of the Fuji X-Pro1 sensor is still superior at low ISOs! At first, I thought that I did something wrong in Lightroom – maybe accidentally applied noise reduction to Fuji X-Pro1 images. However, after looking through the images in detail and resetting to RAW file defaults, I was surprised to find out that the Fuji X-Pro1 RAW files indeed looked cleaner. Here is an example comparison at ISO 200 between the Fuji X-Pro1 and the Canon 5D Mark III:

Fuji X-Pro1 ISO 200 RAW Canon 5D Mark III ISO 200

Take a look at noise levels on both crops and compare noise levels on the second DVD from the bottom. The output from the X-Pro1 looks cleaner!

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Canon 5D Mark III Review

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This is an in-depth review of the new Canon 5D Mark III, a highly anticipated DSLR update to the Canon 5D Mark II that was released back in 2008. Built on the success of the 5D Mark II and featuring the most advanced autofocus system Canon has released to date from its EOS-1D X line, the Canon 5D Mark III is a rather promising upgrade to the 5D line. With an enhanced image sensor with ISO 100 to 25,600 native ISO range, fully weather-sealed camera body, 6 fps burst shooting speed and dual card support, the 5D Mark III seems to target all kinds of photography – from landscapes and fashion to sports and wildlife photography. In this review, I will not only provide detailed information about the camera, but will also compare it to the older Canon 5D Mark II, the Nikon D3s and the new Nikon D800.

Canon 5D Mark III

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Are You Afraid to Ask?

We rarely get to see extraordinary people in our everyday lives. Have you had one of those moments when you saw a stranger that you really wanted to take a picture of? I am sure you have. So what did you do? Did you just photograph the person from afar without them knowing, try to talk that person into being your 30 second model or perhaps you might have tried to sneak up and take a picture? Or even worse, maybe you did not take a picture at all? I guess it has to do with our personality. If you are of shy type with a low confidence level (often a photography rookie), you might be even afraid to ask. That dreaded “No” can be quite discouraging to say the least and many of us don’t even bother to ask for that very reason.

I once asked a big tattooed guy to take his picture, because he had a very colorful outfit that looked very interesting with his tattoos. With plenty of anger on his face, his response was that he would break my camera if I even tried. Oh well, not everyone is approachable for sure! It certainly sounded very discouraging, but did it make me give up on asking? Of course not. I have asked many people since then. And I have photographed many of them, some of which later became my clients.

While doing a short photo walk with the Canon 5D Mark III in Disney Downtown, I came across an Italian guy, who danced away to tunes played by local artists. His dancing was not very good (meaning, he is not a professional dancer or anything), but the way he was dressed and he moved attracted a lot of people:

Street Dancer (1)

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Canon 5D Mark III Light Leak Issue Fix

As you may already know, the very first batches of the Canon 5D Mark III had a manufacturing defect, where light would leak through the top LCD panel as shown in this and this videos. After a thorough investigation, Canon confirmed that the camera indeed had a problem, so it issued an official statement that it would fix the issue if you send the camera to Canon (free of charge).

Original 5D Mark III

Folks at LensRentals.com had a chance to disassemble both an original and a “fixed” Canon 5D Mark III and they discovered that Canon used a black tape over the camera components, which essentially takes care of the problem completely. Here is a picture of the black tape covering the components:

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