Latest B&H Offers

UPDATE: More deals added, including the Canon 5D Mark III 1 day sale!

B&H is now offering the Canon EOS T5i with EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM and EF-S 55-250mm f3/4-5.6 IS STM lenses and a SanDisk 16GB SD memory card with a whopping discount of $500. I was not impressed with the T5i, perhaps better known as 700D, but only for one reason – it is not much of an update to its predecessor, and it seems like a lot of manufacturers are just flooding the market with barely improved products. So what I did not like was the very fact the camera was released so soon after 650D came into market. However, on its own, it is a very capable camera and, from specification standpoint, up there with the best in entry level segment. If you were planning to purchase it, now is a good time to do so, because, for a limited time, the two-lens kit costs just $999 compared to the regular price of $1,499. Follow this link to get to the product page. Mind you, the new price is only visible when you add the camera to the shopping cart.

Canon 700D Rebel T5i

More good news – Nikon Df is in stock for $2,746.95. From what I’ve heard, pre-order numbers were not great for Nikon, but I’ve already asked Nasim, who is working on a review, what he thinks about it. The simple truth is that he likes it – a lot; especially with that exotic and brilliant Nikkor 58mm f/1.4G lens. So I guess our initial assumption still stands – this camera is not for everyone and, if one were rational about it, this camera is a bit of a ripoff. But for those who want it, there is nothing better.

Grab the Canon 5D Mark III for $2,699, will expire tomorrow 12/21/2013.

Other Black Friday Deals

Updated with Sigma lens rebates

More rebates are available from other manufacturers in addition to those already covered. First of all, some Nikon DSLR bodies and mirrorless cameras are offered with instant savings. Nikon 1 J1 with a 10-30mm zoom lens costs just $200! Canon also dropped the price of some of its cameras for the holidays. Then there is Sony E mount lens rebates with instant savings that range from $25 to $200, while Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 5 receives a discount with the price knocked down to $109 (from $141).

Black Friday Deals

Most of these are also offered with free shipping within USA. The majority of Nikon rebates are valid through November 30th. We will keep this list updated with any new rebates that might become available.
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Canon Lens Rebates

If you thought Fujifilm rebates were good, you are going to like what Canon has in store for the holidays. There’s no faffing about with camera+lens bundles, just good old mail-in and instant rebates ranging from $15 for the cheapskate Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 II lens all the way to $300 savings for the likes of professional Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM lenses. More than that, a whole lot of Canon’s best lenses are eligible, the sort that will last you for years and years.

Canon Lens Rebates

Because the list of lenses is so extensive, I broke it down to fixed focal length and zoom lenses so as to help you find what you need easier. Keep in mind that in some cases, the final price is displayed at checkout. Also, some of the rebates are of mail-in type, while others are instant savings. Mail-in rebates are valid through January 4th, 2014. Instant savings are live till November 30th, this year. Now, brace yourselves, there’s a whopping 40+ lenses in total.
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Mirrorless vs DSLR

DSLR cameras by design have some inherent flaws and limitations. Part of it has to do with the fact that SLR cameras were initially developed for film. When digital evolved, it was treated just like film and was housed in the same mechanical body. Aside from the circuitry required for a digital sensor and other electronics, new digital film media and the back LCD, the rest of the SLR components did not change. Same mechanical mirror, same pentaprism / optical viewfinder, same phase detection system for autofocus operation. While new technological advances eventually led to extending of features of these cameras (In-camera editing, HDR, GPS, WiFi, etc), DSLRs continued to stay bulky for a couple of reasons. First, the mirror inside DSLR cameras had to be the same in size as the digital sensor, taking up plenty of space. Second, the pentaprism that converts vertical rays to horizontal in the viewfinder also had to match the size of the mirror, making the top portion of DSLRs bulky.

Mirrorless vs DSLR

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2013 Photo Plus Expo Highlights

Last week was a very busy week for us at Photography Life, since we participated in the PDN Photo Plus Expo in New York and took part in a number of activities related to the event. This was the first time that I took part in a photography event of this magnitude and it was quite an overwhelming experience. My good friend and our team member Tom Redd was able to join me and we both flew from Denver to New York to take part in a four day conference. In this article, I will go over some of the highlights of the event and talk about the upcoming products and some hands-on information, accompanied by photos. I was planning to cover the event at the conference on a daily basis, but I was not able to do it due to my hectic schedule. In summary, it was a great event that will hopefully benefit our site greatly going forward (more on that later).

Photo Plus Entrance

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Canon Lens Abbreviations

Different manufacturers use very different abbreviations to describe the technology used in their lenses even if the technology itself is quite similar. Some abbreviations can be difficult to understand and easily mixed up. We’ve already covered Nikon lens abbreviations. This article will help you understand Canon lens naming terminology.

Canon Lens Abbreviations

1) Canon Lens Format Abbreviations

  • EF – this is the new fully electronic Canon lens mount introduced back in 1987. Lenses marked with EF are compatible with all Canon EOS cameras, digital and film, and are designed to cover 35mm full-frame image circle.
  • EF-S – the only difference between Canon EF and EF-S lenses is that the latter has been designed for Canon digital cameras with APS-C sensors, such as the Canon EOS 700D. Canon EF-S lenses should not (and in most cases can not) be mounted on Canon EOS film and digital full-frame cameras with 36x24mm sized sensors because of the larger mirror used in these cameras. If mounted, damaged to the mirror may be caused upon shutter actuation – it would hit the lens’ rear element. EF-S lenses feature a protective pin that stops these lenses from being mounted on a full-frame EOS camera.
  • EF-M – a new lens format specifically designed for the Canon EOS M mirrorless camera system with EF-M mount. Just like the EF-S lenses, EF-M are designed for APS-C sensor cameras. They will only fit Canon EOS M cameras, though, thanks to shorter flange focal distance (distance between lens mount and film/sensor plane). EF-S and EF lenses can be mounted on EF-M lens mount through the use of appropriate lens mount adapters, but EF-M lenses can not be mounted on the EF mount.
  • FD – this is the old manual focus Canon lens mount used before 1987. Because it was not suitable for autofocus, Canon decided to switch from FD and designed the EOS system with EF mount. Canon FD is now discontinued, but still used by film photography enthusiasts. There are some cracking lenses with the FD mount and, through the use of appropriate adapters, FD lenses can be mounted on modern EOS EF cameras. Adapters with an optical glass element allow infinity focus, while simpler adapters without an additional optical element will not focus at infinity.
  • FDn – the same as FD, only with no coating designation on the lens front (used SSC lens coating).
  • FL – same mount as FD, but without the ability to meter at full aperture.

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Latest Canon Discounts

Updated with 24-70mm f/2.8L II discount

For all the Canon folks, there’s a new discount program for Canon DSLRs that slashed the prices down (considerably in some cases). If you were planning on buying a new Canon DSLR, this is probably as cheap as these particular models (5D Mark III, 7D and T5i/700D) will get before Christmas rebates. Although some discounts are quite minor, you can get up to $300 off the Canon 5D Mark III. Along with the discount, you’ll also get some free stuff thrown in (before December 31st) with value ranging from $68 all the way up to an impressive $175 at B&H. Free accessories include compatible memory cards, batteries, cases, etc. On top of all this there also B&H’s +4% rewards program. Discounted price is listed after checkout and the drop is most likely a permanent price cut.

Canon B&H Discounts

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How to Get Accurate Canon Colors in Lightroom

Our readers often ask us if it is possible to get Lightroom to provide the same colors as one would see from camera-rendered JPEG files when shooting in RAW format. Unfortunately, as you might have noticed when importing files, Lightroom changes the colors immediately after import, when the embedded JPEG files are re-rendered using Adobe’s standard color profiles. As a result, images might appear dull, lack contrast and have completely different colors. I have heard plenty of complaints on this issue for a while now, so I decided to post series of articles for each major manufacturer on how to obtain more accurate colors in Lightroom that resemble the image preview seen on the camera LCD when an image is captured. In this article, I will talk about getting accurate colors from a Canon DSLR in Lightroom.

Camera JPEG vs Adobe RAW

Due to the fact that Adobe’s RAW converter is unable to read proprietary RAW header data, which often contains chosen camera profiles, some settings have to be either applied manually or applied upon import. My personal preference is to apply a preset while importing images, which saves me time later. Before we get into Lightroom, let me first go over camera settings and explain a few important things.

1) RAW File Nuances and Metadata

When shooting in RAW format, most camera settings like White Balance, Sharpness, Saturation, Lens Corrections and Color Profiles do not matter. Unless you use Canon-provided software like Digital Photo Professional, all of those custom settings are mostly discarded by third party applications, including Lightroom and Photoshop. That’s because it is hard to process each piece of proprietary data, which is subject to change from one camera model to another. Now imagine trying to do this for a number of different camera manufacturers!

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Canon EF-S 55-250mm F/4-5.6 IS STM and Powershot G16 Announcement

Canon has just announced a number of new products, with a new lens and high-end compact camera among them. The new lens is a replacement for the older, 2011 release of the 55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS kit zoom lens for Canon APS-C sensor DSLR cameras. The Powershot G16 enthusiast compact camera is a direct replacement of the Powershot G15. The lens and camera offer minor improvements over their predecessors.

Canon EF-S 55-250mm f4-5.6 IS STM

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What Makes Exotic Lenses So Special?

This is a part two to my “why are some lenses so expensive?” article that I wrote yesterday. I already explained the difference between consumer and professional-level lenses in the first post, so now it is time to talk about exotic lenses. With so many exotic lenses on the market today, some of which seem to be in relatively high demand (at least judging by their lack of availability), one might wonder about what makes them so special when compared to everything else. This post is not meant to be technical or basic – I think you can get most of that from the first article. Instead, I want to focus on craftsmanship, price, perceived value and niche marketing – the main drivers behind exotic lenses.

Sigma 35mm f/1.4 vs Nikon 35mm f/1.4 vs Zeiss 35mm f/1.4 vs Rokinon 35mm f/1.4

I once had a conversation with a photography veteran, who was trying to convince me that the new Nikkor and Canon lenses lack “soul”, with their plastic barrels, rubber focus/zoom rings and industrial “mainstream” designs. I disagreed, because I was blown away by the performance of new generation lenses and I just did not care about everything else. Plus, the notion of a lens having a soul just disturbed me and I remember thinking how ridiculous it was even to think about such things. But as time passed by and I got a chance to experience some of the rare and older optics, I started to understand what the photographer was trying to tell me. Most modern lenses do feel as if they are just taken from a conveyor line, where thousands of other lenses are made exactly the same way with little intervention. Older lenses were hand-crafted, one by one, and each lens was unique in its own way. And that was the beauty of it, because you never knew what you got – it was a game of random cards.

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