Adobe Outs Lightroom 5.4 and ACR 8.4 Updates

We’ve still got quite a lot of catching up to do and this time Adobe grabs our attention with the release of new Adobe Camera Raw and Lightroom versions (which basically is the converter only in a separate package and with some added functionality for processing masses of files quickly). Version 8.4 of ACR and 5.4 of Lightroom bring the usual updates – new camera and lens support, some bug fixes and a few new features on top of that. Happily, Photoshop CS6 users are not left out and their ACR can be updated. That said, only new lens/camera profiles and bug fixes are part of the update, whilst new features seem to be reserved for CC only. Clearly, Adobe wants you to move to CC, but does not yet blatantly force you to do it by ignoring “older” software completely – at least until ACR 9 arrives.

Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 5.4

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Adobe’s Silent Exposure Compensation

When using Lightroom, you might be wondering why the highlight recovery between different camera models allows for different room. Given the “color of light” (light source color temperature and tint) is the same, the highlight recovery difference depends primarily on baseline exposure compensation applied to a raw file when it is opened in Adobe raw converters (Adobe Camera Raw, ACR; or Lightroom, LR). This baseline exposure compensation is applied behind the scenes, the exposure compensation slider after the file is opened stays at zero. This is Adobe’s way to equalize cameras.

Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 5

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Lightroom 5.3 and Camera RAW 8.3 Update

Today Adobe announced the availability of the final versions of Lightroom 5.3 and Camera RAW 8.3 (the previous version was a release candidate). A number of bugs that were present in Lightroom 5.3 have been fixed, and new camera and lens profiles have been added. No new features have been added, so this is mostly a camera / lens update + bugfix release. For those that recently purchased the Nikon Df, this release provides full RAW support for the camera! Other new cameras that are now supported since the release of the 8.3 RC include the Canon EOS M2, Casio EX-10, Nokia Lumia 1020 and Pentax K-3.

Lightroom 5

Camera and Lens Support

Here is the list of all newly supported camera models:

  • Canon EOS M2
  • Canon PowerShot S120
  • Casio EX-10
  • Fujifilm XQ1
  • Fujifilm X-E2
  • Nikon 1 AW1
  • Nikon Coolpix P7800
  • Nikon Df
  • Nikon D610
  • Nikon D5300
  • Nokia Lumia 1020
  • Olympus OM-D E-M1
  • Olympus STYLUS 1
  • Panasonic DMC-GM1
  • Pentax K-3
  • Phase One IQ260
  • Phase One IQ280
  • Sony A7 (ILCE-7)
  • Sony A7R (ILCE-7R)
  • Sony DSC-RX10

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Adobe Lightroom 5 Flash Sale at B&H

A boxed version of Adobe’s Photoshop Lightroom 5, which we already reviewed, has just received a limited time discount. You can get a boxed copy for both Mac OS and Windows for just $89! The offer runs out in a couple of hours at 4:00 PM EST (that’s about two and a half hours from now), so you better make up your mind quick whether you want it or not. Suffice to say, at that price, it is quite a bargain.

Lightroom 5

In order to take advantage of this flash sale, follow this link and order your copy of the software. Shipping is free within USA. Adobe Photoshop Lightroom 5 is the software tool that I used more (much more, at that) than any other for my personal and wedding photography, including full-fledged Photoshop. Here a quick summary of our review:

Adobe has, once again, released a well thought-through product that is certain to make the workflow of a lot of professional photographers very efficient. I’m not going to start raving endlessly about every single feature it has and how it has helped me save time while post-processing. You may have already gotten that point if you have read my Mastering Lightroom series articles and various comparisons. Suffice to say, that with the help of the more powerful Spot Removal tool as well as the newly added Radial Filter and Upright tools, it has become even more capable than before. That is a serious achievement given how good Lightroom 4 was. The very minor, but extremely useful inclusion of the full-screen preview mode (triggered by hitting “F” key on your keyboard) is the icing on the cake. Add that to a superb control of tones and colors as well as very natural-looking noise reduction mechanism of the previous versions and you have one software tool that can replace several dedicated programs for a lot of us. It is a natural companion to anyone shooting RAW professionally or just for the fun of it. And, perhaps even more so than ever, Lightroom emphasizes speed, so that we spend less time post-processing and more time photographing. Not to mention all the new cameras that are now supported by Lightroom.

Adobe Drops Eligibility Requirements for CC Photography Bundle

I received an email from Adobe’s marketing staff today, which basically says that for a limited time, Adobe is now dropping eligibility requirements for its Adobe Creative Cloud Photography Bundle, which goes for $9.99 per month and includes Photoshop and Lightroom. This basically means that you do not have to prove ownership of any Adobe product in order to qualify for the $9.99 per month pricing. As you might already know, the photography bundle started back in September. Since the launch price of $20 per month for each application was too steep for many creative professionals and hobbyists, Adobe’s initially projected goal was not met. So in a desperate measure to increase the number of subscribers, Adobe dropped the price down to $9.99 per month, but with one condition – one had to prove ownership of CS3 or later in order to qualify. While it sounded like a good deal, many were ticked off when they found out that their particular version was not eligible for the photography bundle deal. Now Adobe is in yet another desperate mode to increase the number of subscribers, so it has dropped this requirement completely.

Adobe Photoshop CC

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Lightroom 5.3 and Camera RAW 8.3 RC Update

Today Adobe announced the availability of Lightroom 5.3 and Camera RAW 8.3 release candidates. A number of bugs that were present in Lightroom 5.2 were fixed, and new camera and lens profiles have been added. No new features have been added, so this is mostly a camera / lens update + bugfix release. For those that recently purchased the Nikon D610, this release provides full RAW support for the camera! Other new cameras that are supported include the Nikon D5300, Nikon 1 AW1, Fuji X-E2, Olympus OM-D E-M1, Sony A7 and Sony A7R.

Lightroom 5

Camera and Lens Support

Here is the list of newly supported camera models:

  • Canon PowerShot S120
  • Fujifilm XQ1
  • Fujifilm X-E2
  • Nikon 1 AW1
  • Nikon Coolpix P7800
  • Nikon D610
  • Nikon D5300 (*)
  • Olympus OM-D E-M1
  • Olympus STYLUS 1 (*)
  • Panasonic DMC-GM1
  • Phase One IQ260
  • Phase One IQ280
  • Sony A7 (ILCE-7)
  • Sony A7R (ILCE-7R)
  • Sony DSC-RX10 (*)

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How to Fix Panorama Merging Errors

This is a follow-up article to the tutorial I published a few days ago on how to create a panorama image in Lightroom. In the article, I used a very simple and straightforward panorama image which could be merged without any errors virtually on first try. The image did not have a main object of interest and only a few points that needed critical precision during stitching process. I chose this image for the sake of convenience – I didn’t want it to cause any apparent problems while I tried to explain how to seamlessly include Photoshop or any other panorama merging software in your Lightroom workflow. However, we all understand that, more often than not and especially with Brenizer method panoramas that I love so much, the stitching process is far from being perfectly accurate every time. More complex panoramas require several tries before the stitching is done properly, or manual correction. But how do you manually correct a panorama that you are trying to merge through Lightroom? It is actually easier than you may think and is unlikely to upset your workflow in any way.

How to Fix Panorama Merging Errors

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How to Get Accurate Canon Colors in Lightroom

Our readers often ask us if it is possible to get Lightroom to provide the same colors as one would see from the back of the LCD on Nikon, Canon and other DSLRs when shooting in RAW format. Unfortunately, as you might have noticed when importing files, Lightroom changes the colors immediately after import, when the embedded JPEG files are re-rendered using Adobe’s standard color profiles. As a result, images might appear dull, lack contrast and have completely different colors. I have heard plenty of complaints on this issue for a while now, so I decided to post series of articles for each major manufacturer on how to obtain more accurate colors in Lightroom that resemble the image preview seen on the camera LCD when an image is captured. In this article, I will talk about getting accurate colors from a Canon DSLR in Lightroom.

Camera JPEG vs Adobe RAW

Due to the fact that Adobe’s RAW converter is unable to read proprietary RAW header data, which often contains chosen camera profiles, some settings have to be either applied manually or applied upon import. My personal preference is to apply a preset while importing images, which saves me time later. Before we get into Lightroom, let me first go over camera settings and explain a few important things.

1) RAW File Nuances and Metadata

When shooting in RAW format, most camera settings like White Balance, Sharpness, Saturation, Lens Corrections and Color Profiles do not matter. Unless you use Canon-provided software like Digital Photo Professional, all of those custom settings are mostly discarded by third party applications, including Lightroom and Photoshop. That’s because it is hard to process each piece of proprietary data, which is subject to change from one camera model to another. Now imagine trying to do this for a number of different camera manufacturers!

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How to Get Accurate Nikon Colors in Lightroom

Our readers often ask us if it is possible to get Lightroom to provide the same colors as one would see from the back of the LCD on Nikon, Canon and other DSLRs when shooting in RAW format. Unfortunately, as you might have noticed when importing files, Lightroom changes the colors immediately after import, when the embedded JPEG files are re-rendered using Adobe’s standard color profiles. As a result, images might appear dull, lack contrast and have completely different colors. I have heard plenty of complaints on this issue for a while now, so I decided to post series of articles for each major manufacturer on how to obtain more accurate colors in Lightroom that resemble the image preview seen on the camera LCD when an image is captured. In this article, I will talk about getting accurate colors from a Nikon DSLR in Lightroom.

Camera JPEG vs Adobe RAW

Due to the fact that Adobe’s RAW converter is unable to read proprietary RAW header data, which often contains chosen camera profiles, some settings have to be either applied manually or applied upon import. My personal preference is to apply a preset while importing images, which saves me time later. Before we get into Lightroom, let me first go over camera settings and explain a few important things.

1) RAW File Nuances and Metadata

When shooting in RAW format, most camera settings like White Balance, Sharpness, Saturation, Lens Corrections and Color Profiles do not matter. Unless you use Nikon-provided software like Capture NX or View NX, all of those custom settings are mostly discarded by third party applications, including Lightroom and Photoshop. That’s because it is hard to process each piece of proprietary data, which is subject to change from one camera model to another. Now imagine trying to do this for a number of different camera manufacturers!

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Adobe Creative Cloud Fail – Part 2

A while ago, I posted an article on why I thought Adobe’s Creative Cloud model was a bad idea. The feedback from our readers was great, with over 300 comments and counting. Most agreed with my stance on why the “renting” model was not for everyone and talked about the risks associated with going to the cloud. Today, Adobe reported that its security was breached and hackers were able to obtain private information including customer names, encrypted credit/debit card numbers, expiration dates and other private data for 2.9 million customers, all part of the Creative Cloud subscription model.

Adobe Creative Cloud Fail

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