Featured Articles and Reviews

Arca-Swiss C1 Cube Review

In this review, I will talk about my experience and impressions with using perhaps the finest tripod head I have seen to date, the Arca-Swiss C1 Cube. … [Continue Reading]

Arca-Swiss C1 Cube

Wildlife Photography Tips Part One

I hope the idea I have in my head for this wildlife photography series of articles turns out on paper the way I imagined it and you find some useful … [Continue Reading]

Coastal Grizzly Bear Photo

What is Ghosting and Flare?

When light rays coming from a bright source(s) of light (such as the sun or artificial light) directly reach the front element of a camera lens, they … [Continue Reading]

Lens Flare

Profoto B1 500 AirTTL Review

When Profoto announced their first truly portable setup with the Profoto B1 500 AirTTL battery powered flash last year, the news immediately caught my … [Continue Reading]

Profoto B1 with Battery

Leica M7 Review

This is a review of the Leica M7 TTL .72 rangefinder film camera that I used with the Leica 35mm f/2.0 Summicron M Aspherical Manual Focus Lens. I had … [Continue Reading]

Leica M7

How to Photograph the Milky Way

Many travel and landscape photographers, including myself, try to avoid shooting scenery with a clear blue sky. As much as we like seeing puffy or … [Continue Reading]

Arches Night Sky by Tom Redd

Sigma Lens Abbreviations

Sigma lenses have been getting more and more popular in recent years thanks to some truly professional-grade optics (like the 35mm f/1.4 HSM Art, for example). As every other manufacturer, however, they use different designations for various bits of technology incorporated into the lenses. In this article, I will go through the most important Sigma lens abbreviations you might come across. Thankfully, there are not that many of them despite the fact Sigma has a broad lens line-up, so there’s not all that much to remember.

Sigma Lens Abbreviations

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Fuji X-T1 vs X-E2

Since the newest camera in Fujifilm’s lineup, the X-T1, has already been compared in terms of specifications to the flagship X-Pro1 model, it seems only fair to finish this marathon of comparisons by seeing how it measures up against a model positioned slightly lower in the range. That is, of course, the Fujifilm X-E2 – arguably the best camera overall in the Fujifilm’s range, at least until X-T1 showed up. Naturally, the X-T1, being newer, packs the latest technology, but the X-E2 isn’t exactly old and, considering that $300 price difference, is a serious rival for the higher-end model.

Fuji X-T1 vs X-E2

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Best Focal Length to Get Into Wildlife Photography

What’s the BEST Lens for Wildlife Photography? If I had a nickel for every time I was asked this question, I could retire. It’s a very common and extremely valid question to ask. And to cut right to the chase, there is no one or right answer to this question. And that’s for many reasons from you, the photographer to the subject and most importantly, to the story you want to tell with your photograph. But there is a focal length that gets used over and over again and I feel is the best one to start with.

Allen's Hummingbird

400mm, you simply can’t go wrong with this focal length however you get to it. It’s the focal length I started with and depended on for the first years of my career. It’s the lessons I learned from that lens and some of the images it created that got me to this point. You can get to this focal length in many ways, 300mm f/4 with a converter, 80-400mm, 200-400mm or a 400mm prime. No matter how you get there or which lens you have, you have the same angle of view and that’s key.

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Hasselblad HV Announcement

I was wrong – Hasselblad seems to be determined to continue its partnership with Sony in ways we find somewhat…questionable. They have recently announced their third rebranded Sony camera, the Hasselblad HV. This time it is not based on Sony’s mirrorless system, however, but is built around their flagship DSLR/SLT camera, the A99. As with Hasselblad Lunar, which we failed to understand, the changes are purely cosmetic – the sensor and all other internal bits are exactly the same between the two. And, as with Lunar, the new HV carries a premium price tag of, wait for it, around $11,500 for the camera body with the Zeiss 24-70mm f/2.8 lens. Interested?

Hasselblad HV_Front

Overview and Key Specifications

Let’s now forget about the price for a little bit and run through the official specs derived from Sony’s website. At the heart of the camera there is a 24.3 megapixel full-frame sensor courtesy of Sony. It is exactly the same as in the SLT-A99, Sony A7 and the RX1, and very similar to that found in the Nikon D600/D610 cameras. This sensor is among the best full-frame units in the industry, so high image quality is a given with the new Hasselblad HV. What is important to mention is that, much like the rest of Sony’s current SLT camera range, the HV is not actually a DSLR. Instead of a traditional DSLR mirror mechanism from manufacturers such as Nikon and Canon, the camera features a translucent mirror (also known as pellicle mirror). Which means part of the light coming through the lens is reflected towards the phase-detect AF module, but the bigger part goes straight through towards the sensor whilst the mirror remains static during exposure. This also means there is no optical viewfinder – an EVF is used instead. The OLED EVF is, no doubt, one of the best units in the industry and is as sharp as you would hope it to be with 2,360k dots. The magnification is 0.71x, so it is not as big as newest EVF cameras, such as the Fujifilm X-T1, but still pretty impressive in its own right.

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Equipment for Sale

It has been a while since I have cleared out my stack of camera gear. After going through everything last week, I decided to put a few items that I no longer need on sale. Although I initially thought about keeping most of it, I just hate to see lenses and cameras gathering dust for too long – I am sure someone else could find better use for it. Most of the money will be used for upgrades and other equipment for the business. If you are interested in multiple items, feel free to make me an offer via the contact form. I am the first and only owner of all below items and I have all the original manuals, boxes, soft cases, warranty cards, etc. A few extras are included, see more below.

Shipping: while I can ship internationally, my preference is to sell to US customers, since it is less risky. Credit card / PayPal fees are included, but shipping and insurance are not. Colorado residents are welcome to contact me for a face to face sale. All sales are final and are on first come first serve basis.

1) Nikon D3s (SOLD)

The Nikon D3s has been my wildlife workhorse and Lola’s favorite wedding camera for the past couple of years. Its ISO performance is amazing – as good as on the D4 (see this ISO comparison) and the shutter speed fires like a machine gun at 9 fps. Autofocus is top notch and the build quality is Nikon’s best. But I have not been using it as much lately and Lola already chose the Nikon Df as her wedding/portrait camera. That’s why I want to sell it. See my detailed Nikon D3s Review for more information.

Nikon D3s Front

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Capture Clip Pro vs SpiderPro Camera Holster Review

We recently reviewed the Sport Strap from BlackRapid which we really liked, but for some people straps are still too bothersome. There are alternatives that allow the photographer to clip their cameras to a belt and avoid the strap altogether if they so desire. The Capture Clip Pro from Peak Design and the SpiderPro Camera Holster from Shai Gear are both strapless camera carrying systems that give you the feeling of stepping back in time to the days of the wild west but instead of gunslinging, you’re a camera toting cowboy. In this head-to-head review, we will examine the Capture Clip Pro vs the SpiderPro Camera Holster and try to help you know which system might be best for you.

It should be noted that we are specifically reviewing the Pro versions here, but both companies make less expensive versions that are well suited for smaller/lighter gear.

1) Capture Clip Pro (v.2) from Peak Design

First up is the Capture Clip Pro (v.2) from Peak Design. Capture Clip was initially brought to market as a successful Kickstarter project and now they have their second version of the Capture Clip.

Capture Clip Pro Kit

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New Zealand – A Photographer’s Dream

I had the opportunity at the end of 2013 to re-visit New Zealand for three week self-drive holiday and take a wide range of photos. Since New Zealand is on the ‘bucket list’ of many photographers, I thought I would share some thoughts on which areas of the country provide some of the best photographic opportunities. All of these suggestions are based on personal experience, having spent about 6 weeks driving thousands of kilometers throughout the country on a couple of different trips.

Moeraki #2

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Will you join us in the Bahamas?

As you may already know, our friends at Fstoppers are hosting workshops in the Bahamas this year, at the Atlantis Resort. When I met Patrick and Lee earlier this year at the Photo Plus conference, I had a chance to talk to them about the workshop and they were super excited about it. When compared to other workshops and conferences, the idea behind the Fstoppers workshop is very unique – to gather a relatively small group of photographers and have them spend time not only learning from some of the best photographers and instructors, but also get to know them in person, along with meeting other industry peers. And instead of doing it in a traditional classroom format, do it in a remote location to combine education with personal vacation and fun.

Fstoppers Workshops 2014

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Fuji X-T1 vs X-Pro1

Fuji’s latest cameras have been so good, they rival each other almost as much as other systems. And as we saw in our X-Pro1 vs X-E2 comparison, the oldest current model in the X-mount compact camera system, the X-Pro1, already struggled against its lower-end sibling. In this article, we will compare it against the newest member in Fuji’s line-up of mirrorless cameras, the weather-resistant, DSLR-style Fujifilm X-T1.

Fuji X-T1 vs X-Pro1

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Olympus OM-D E-M10 Announcement

Thanks to the rise of the mirrorless camera market, manufacturers are now creating more and more segments in their camera lines. With the introduction of the X-T1, Fujifilm now boasts a total of 5 different cameras, all targeted at different segments. Today Olympus also extended its line of mirrorless cameras by introducing the new Olympus OM-D E-M10, a budget version of the OM-D premium mirrorless cameras. Next to the OM-D E-M1 and OM-D E-M5, this is now the third premium camera designed to appeal the enthusiast crowd. It borrows most of its guts from its bigger brother, the OM-D E-M5, but in a smaller and lighter package. Priced at $699 MSRP, it is significantly cheaper than other OM-D series cameras. In a way, it is a confusing release, because it is even cheaper than the PEN E-P5 (currently at $799). Since all PEN series do not come with a built-in electronic viewfinder or weather sealing options, they are technically inferior to OM-D series. Now with the the OM-D E-M10, it is hard to say exactly what market this camera is targeted for, with its features and price range in comparison. Let’s take a look at the camera in more detail.

Olympus OM-D E-M10

Key Specifications and Overview

While the Olympus OM-D E-M10 has a 16 MP sensor, it is slightly different than the one used on the OM-D E-M5. First, it has a little less resolution (16.1 MP vs 16.3 MP) and second, it features boosted ISO 100 (Low), similar to what the E-M1 does. Its image processor is the same one as used on the E-M1 (TruePic VII with Fine Detail Processing II). The first major difference between the E-M10 and its bigger siblings is the somewhat limited in-body stabilization. Both E-M1 and E-M5 have 5-axis image stabilization, while the E-M10 has 3-axis stabilization. Another difference is the slower speed of 8 fps in single mode and 3.5 fps in continuous mode (the E-M5 is 9 fps / 4.2 fps and the E-M1 is 10 fps / 6.5 fps). Shutter speed is limited to 1/4000 and the viewfinder is the same 1.4 million dot EVF found on the E-M5. The LCD screen has not changed, it is still a high resolution 3.0″ tilting one.

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