Nikon D810

An in-depth Nikon D810 review with sample images, high ISO tests and detailed real-life analysis

Nikon D810 and Sigma 50mm f1 (2)

Some of our readers have been asking about the performance of the Sigma 50mm f/1.4 Art lens on the Nikon D810, particularly about its autofocus […]

Nikon D810 Bird Photography (2)

We are continuing our coverage of the Nikon D810 and today we want to talk about the capability of the D810 to photograph wildlife, particularly […]

© Tadas Kazakevičius. Children of Silenai (9)

Talking to Tadas Kazakevičius (in case you are having a hard time spelling that, he’s just as well known as Ted Kozak), a young Lithuanian […]

Enagement Session #23

Engagement sessions are a big hit with couples and photographers. Almost all couples agree for a session before the wedding, so engagement photography has pretty […]

Fuji X-T1

An in-depth review of the Fuji X-T1 mirrorless camera with image samples, specifications and comparisons to other cameras -

Fujinon XF 50-140mm f/2.8 R and XF 56mm f/1.2 R APD Announced

Fujinon XF 50-140mm f2.8 R LM OIS WR on Fujifilm X-T1

Just as Fujifilm promised in their latest roadmap, the last quarter of 2014 sees the announcement of their first professional-grade telephoto zoom lens, the XF 50-140mm f/2.8 R LM OIS WR. The surprise release, however, is the revised version of the already-very-popular XF 56mm f/1.2 lens that features an apodization filter. Let’s take a closer look at the specifications of both lenses.

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Silver Fujifilm X-T1 Announced, Firmware Update on its Way

Fujifilm X-T1 Graphite Silver_Front

Along with the new X100T and a couple of lenses, Fujifilm has also announced a “Graphite Silver” version of their well-received X-T1 mirrorless camera. Unlike other silver/black versions of mirrorless cameras that Fujifilm offers – X-E2 immediately springs to mind – X-T1 has a darker shade body. It is definitely more conspicuous than the black body of the original X-T1, but not as much as a regular silver camera would be. It is also more expensive. And don’t worry, there are indeed some better news that owners of black X-T1’s will find very welcome.

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Fujifilm X100T Announced

Fujifilm X100T Black_Front

Back in 2010 – has it really been that long? – Fujifilm started their Renaissance with the release of X100, a compact camera with a fixed, 35mm equivalent lens and a large APS-C sized image sensor at its heart. It was a camera towards which few remained indifferent. Plagued by Fujifilms quirks, most of which have been attended with most thorough and impressive firmware upgrades since, the camera also had a beautiful design and brilliant, unheard of feature – hybrid EVF/OVF. Whether you liked the original X100 or not, most will agree it was a breath of fresh air in the camera industry where most products were, for the lack of a better word, soulless and slightly boring. Four years later, the mark III version is out – called X100T.

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JPEGmini Pro Review

JPEGmini Pro Total Space Saved

When providing high resolution images to our clients, or uploading images to this website, I often extract JPEG images between 70%-85% quality. Although some photographers often do extract their images at 100% quality, I rarely felt the need to do it, since file sizes get outrageously big, while the differences in quality are too small (and often impossible) to notice. I recently came across an interesting product by JPEGmini called “JPEGmini Pro“, which is specifically targeted at photographers like me that are looking for a good way to save space without losing image quality. By design, JPEG is a pretty compressed image format that was designed for the web in mind. It applies compression algorithms to reduce massive images in other formats like TIFF and offers the ability to use different compression levels. So when I first looked at JPEGmini Pro, I wondered how different it was compared to the JPEG engine used in Adobe Photoshop and Lightroom, the two programs I use the most to extract images. In this review, I will be exploring the Lightroom version of the JPEGmini Pro, which seamlessly integrates into my workflow without adding any complexity or unnecessary overhead.

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Zeiss Otus 85mm f/1.4 APO Planar T* Announcement

Zeiss Otus 85mm f1.4 APO Planar T

Do you remember the bonkers Zeiss Otus 55mm f/1.4 lens? If you’ve forgotten, here’s a quick reminder. With Otus lenses, Zeiss is basically trying to show the legendary brand’s worth. You might find that somewhat bewildering since most current Zeiss lenses for DSLRs are very, very good and worthy of the name. But with Otus, the German manufacturer wants to release simply the best lenses available for DSLRs from an optical standpoint. And so the first lens of the series was extremely big, heavy, complex and expensive, but also rather beautiful and astonishing optically. As anyone could guess, a 55mm lens with a price tag of $4000 is bound to spawn differing opinions, not least because Otus line-up is manual focus only. Suffice to say the new 85mm family member with the same impressive size, performance and a price tag of, as near as makes no difference, $4500 is going to be no different.

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Choice is a Beautiful Thing…

Nikon D610 vs D800E vs Df vs D4 vs D4s

Every once in a while, an article we post here at PL creates huge debates due to disagreements between readers and the poster, or between readers themselves on a photography-related subject. Sometimes such discussions lead to very productive results, with all parties learning something from each other. Other times, all we see is provocative and sometimes even insulting comments. One such article that contained a little bit of both was Tom Stirr’s recent post on post-processing difficult images. Before hitting the “Publish” button (and yes, I do personally publish every single article here at PL for different reasons), I already knew that it would spark up some discussions.

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What is a Decentered Lens?

Decentered Lens

A decentered lens contains one or more optical lens elements that are either moved or tilted from the principal axis of the lens. Such shifting or tilting of lens elements can potentially lead to blurring / softness of parts of the image due to divergence of light rays. While very slight decentering of optical elements can be observed in many lenses, especially on superzooms, severe decentering and tilting can render the whole image blurry, with the lens unable to achieve good sharpness across the frame.

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Post-processing Difficult Images

Working with difficult files Image 1

I recently spent a lot of time working with some quite challenging files to prepare my recent article “Photographing aircraft in flight with the Tamron 150-600mm”, and a Photography Life reader asked if I could share some of the details of the processing that I do with difficult files.

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Photographing Aircraft in Flight with the Tamron 150-600mm Lens

Photographing aircraft with Tamron 150-600mm (2)

On Labour Day weekend, I had the opportunity to go to the International Air Show at the Canadian National Exhibition in Toronto and photograph various aircraft in flight. I arranged for use of a new Tamron 150-600mm VC lens (see our detailed review) and used it with my Nikon D800. This article provides some thoughts on how that combination performed, as well as sharing some of the techniques I used to capture the images in this article.

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How to Make Autofocus Work in Extremely Low Light

Autofocus in Low Light

Have you ever been in a situation where light conditions were so poor that your camera would completely refuse to autofocus, with the lens constantly going back and forth “hunting” for focus? I am sure you have, since it is a very common problem. Sometimes you want to photograph your loved one in candle light, or snap a shot of your child blowing out candles on a birthday cake. Or perhaps, you are dealing with a DJ that decides to turn off all lights on the wedding dance floor, killing your chances of getting any shots in focus, even when you are fully prepared with flashes to light up your subjects. That’s exactly what happened to me and Lola last weekend when we were shooting a wedding. Lola came up to me and asked if there was anything she could do to make autofocus work again and I thought of an old trick that really does work when dealing with such situations.

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