Nikon Communication Unit UT-1 Released

UT-1 Communication Unit Front

Today, along with other announcements, Nikon has also released a new communication unit, the UT-1. This unit allows Ethernet connection between your camera and computer, allowing you to upload photographs to your computer as you take them, or control your DSLR remotely. If you couple UT-1 with the WT-5 wireless transmitter, same actions can be performed over a wireless network.

You should be able to pre-order the UT-1 Communication Unit from our most trusted reseller, B&H, very soon by following this link.

Here is the full list of features (quoting Nikon):

  • Wireless network support when used in combination with the WT-5
    When used with the WT-5 (available separately), UT-1 networking functions can be used over wireless networks. Nikon also markets an UT-1/WT-5 bundle that provides networking functions over both Ethernet and wireless networks.
  • Image transfer
    Still images can be transferred as they are captured, and still images and movies already stored on a memory card can be saved to a computer or FTP server.
  • Transfer of images to an FTP server
    Still images and movies can be automatically uploaded and saved to an FTP server as they are captured, enabling transfer of a high volume of high-resolution image data captured by a digital-SLR camera. This allows for verification of images from a remote location by those not in the immediate vicinity of the camera.
  • Remote camera control from a computer
    When used with Camera Control Pro 2, remote control software developed for studio and remote photography in the field (available separately), remote control over a wide variety of Nikon digital-SLR camera functions from a computer is possible. Camera Control Pro 2 allows users to specify and adjust shooting settings such as exposure mode, shutter speed, aperture, and white balance, and also to use live view photography and even record movies remotely. In addition, still images and movies can be saved directly to the computer as they are recorded with remote shooting using Camera Control Pro 2.
  • Superior handling for efficient studio and field photography
    The UT-1 can be mounted on the camera’s accessory shoe or on a tripod. When another accessory, such as a Speedlight, is mounted on the accessory shoe, the camera and UT-1 can be mounted on a tripod using the optional SK-7 bracket for smooth handling.
  • UT-1 and WT-5 on a D800 DSLR

    This is likely going to be most useful for studio photographers.

    Official Press Release

    Nikon releases the Communication Unit UT-1, which supports more efficient image transfer over Ethernet and wireless networks for digital-SLR cameras

    September 13, 2012

    UT-1 Communication Unit Back

    TOKYO – Nikon Corporation is pleased to announce the release of the Communication Unit UT-1. When connected to a digital-SLR camera, an Ethernet (wired) network can be used to transfer images from the camera to a computer or FTP server, or to control the camera remotely from a computer. When used with the Wireless Transmitter WT-5 (available separately), the same functions can be performed over a wireless network.

    The UT-1 is compatible with the Nikon D4, D800, and D800E cameras for professional and advanced amateur photographers, as well as the D7000 for photo hobbyists. With an Ethernet network connection, still images can be automatically transferred as they are captured, and still images and movies already stored on a memory card can be transferred and saved to a computer or FTP server.

    In addition, when the WT-5 is connected to the UT-1, smooth image transfer over a wireless network is possible. Nikon plans to market an UT-1/WT-5 bundle, Communication Unit Wireless Kit UT-1WK.

    When used with Camera Control Pro 2, remote control software developed for studio and remote photography in the field (available separately), remote control over a wide variety of Nikon digital-SLR camera functions from a computer is possible. Camera Control Pro 2 allows users to specify and adjust not only basic shooting settings such as exposure mode, shutter speed, and aperture setting, but also allows them to adjust white balance, use live view photography, and even record movies remotely. With remote control over camera operations, such as in a studio setting, images are transferred directly to the computer, enabling immediate verification of photos as they are captured.

    These communications functions significantly increase on-site work efficiency for all photographers, beginning with professionals.

    With the combination of the D4 and its built-in Ethernet network functions, the WT-5, and the UT-1, Nikon is working to make photography more efficient for professional and advanced amateur photographers. The Wireless Mobile Adapter WU-1a and WU-1b can be used to easily transfer highquality images captured with cameras such as the D3200 and D600 to a smart device, or to control the camera remotely (remote control over movie recording is not supported). Wireless connection to the Internet using operations similar to those to which smart phone users are accustomed is also possible with the COOLPIX S800c. By continuously working to increase wireless network functionality and support for all of its digital cameras, from high-end digital-SLRs to compact digital cameras, Nikon is helping users of its cameras to remain connected.

    Comments

    1. September 13, 2012 at 10:35 am

      Still no iPhone or iPad control via a web interface though huh? Would really like that on a D800.

    2. 2
      ) Simon
      September 13, 2012 at 10:46 am

      Elegant it is not.

      Seriously: does anybody think that Jonathan Ive would let something like this out the factory door at Apple?

      Nikon spent money getting Giorgetto Giugiaro to consult on the design of their SLR bodies: my opinion is that the Giugario consultancy did a good job. But then the Japanese engineers fit this Tower of Babel on the hot shoe on top.

      No thanks Nikon. Nikon deserve a kick in the pants coming out with this junk. As they do the equally as hideous GP1 GPS boondongle.

      • September 13, 2012 at 10:51 am

        Hahaha, I wish I could “like” this comment or give it a thumbs up!!! :-)

      • Avatar of Romanas Naryškin
        5
        ) Romanas Naryškin
        September 13, 2012 at 11:19 am

        It’s ugly, yes, I wholeheartedly agree. However, as long as it’s functional, most professionals won’t care. :)

    3. 4
      ) TimR
      September 13, 2012 at 11:00 am

      jeez i gotta hand it to camera companies making beautiful cameras whereas they make accessories that look like they been assimilated by the borg lol

    4. 6
      ) Isaac
      September 13, 2012 at 12:24 pm

      I think this is a cool piece of gear but this technology is already dated. This should be built in camera. I also agree that this device it is not so pretty. I would like to ask why didn’t they come out with this as a grip accessory and mount it under the camera in place of the hot shoe mount? Have a small connecting cable to the hot shoe if you must for activation. Japan is making good effort, after the tsunami wiped out their infrastructure ….While I am thinking about it why cant my dslr just connect to my WiFi to check for updates (firmware updates) and allow me to connect to any other device on the same WiFi? shoot to my iPad, tablet, laptop, or raid storage device? This is a step in a good direction but still lacking.

    5. 7
      ) Martin
      September 13, 2012 at 12:41 pm

      I totally agree with Isaac,. In addition when you are in field work, this is not practical at all, or imagine you are in a small hide, or on a footbal game running around with the monopod and your camera trying to shoot and get to good shooting position. This has to be smaller, more compact or incorporated into the camera.

    6. 8
      ) MK
      September 13, 2012 at 8:45 pm

      and if I want to use in stúdio with my pocketwizard?

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